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Seyyid Battal Gazi Complex

on 27/08/2015
Seyyid Battal Gazi Complex

Seyyid Battal Gazi Complex

Seyyid Battal Gazi Complex is located in Seyitgazi, a small town 43 km      south-east of Eskişehir. It was built over the centuries on the hill where Mesih Castle was once located.

The original Byzantine church was turned into a mosque upon the initiative of Ümmühan Hatun, mother of the Seljuk Sultan Alaeddin Keykubat. She was later buried there.

The Ottomans added a second smaller mosque, a medrese, kitchens and a bakery for the community, as well as diverse buildings and rooms for religious ceremonies and official visits. Further expansions and transformations took place during the reigns of Mehmed the Conqueror, Bayezid II, Selim I and Suleiman the Magnificent.

Being located on the Hejaz – Baghdad – Istanbul line, Seyitgazi became an important stopover town for the pilgrims on their way to Mecca.

During the reign of Bayezid II, the complex was turned into a convent for the Kalender Dervishes.

On the right-hand side of the Sema room, where the Whirling Dervishes performed their dance ceremony, you will find the tomb of Seyyid Battal, warrior who died a martyr in 740. According to legend, the deceased was 2.30m tall and the impressive tomb is 5.50m long. In the much smaller tomb next to him, lies Elenora, the Emperor’s daughter who, rumour has it, was in love with Seyyid Battal.

Tomb of Seyyid Battal Gazi

Tomb of Seyyid Battal Gazi

In the 17th century, the complex became an important monastery allocated to the Bektashi Dervishes and stayed as such until the early 19th century.

Today, this place imbued with spirituality is managed by the Seyyid Battal Gazi Foundation and is open to visitors.


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